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20121212
20121212
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, the assistant democrat leader, mr. clyburn. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for three minutes. mr. clyburn: thank you, mr. speaker. i request permission to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. clyburn: i thank the gentlelady for yielding me this time. mr. speaker, when the so-called supercommittee failed last year to overcome the obstruction of the tea party republicans and their leader, grover norquist, to achieve a fair and balanced plan for deficit reduction, economic growth, and job creation it would take a decisive national election to settle the matter. i believe president obama's victory on november 6 was very decisive and pretty definitive. during the campaign president obama very clearly laid out his vision and the american people strongly affirmed his position. the president won all but one of the swing states. 62% of the electoral college, and carried the popular vote by more than 4.
don't realize, there are many more to be licensees that other people realize. in new york, where i am, the number is 28. there was a large allocation of these licenses before cable and satellite and what we're doing now, and this is the -- i think innovation of auctions, how can we use market mechanisms to reallocate some of that spectrum to mobile broadband in a win-win way? and that is what we're doing. that is why there will be brauferts who remain in new york and -- broadcasters who remain in new york and others. there is tremendous opportunity to free up spectrum to promote innovation. >> when we moved over the 200 megahertz in 2003, we had a two-star general who said it's absolutely technologically impossible to do. so again, do you have a process that's totally fair to the broadcasters and to the wireless industry that's in place? have you had them in your office simultaneously with their engineers to talk about the issues so that you can hear and your experts can hear the differences which they have? >> that's exactly what we're doing. through the notice and comment process, t
: another headline from "the new york times," "fiscal talks he up." boehner talks about where he will find allegiance within his party, the article also talks about where they will find support in the house from democrats. "no signs of reaching a deal revealed." as part of this so-called fix -- fiscal cliff, what tax deductions would you give up? fort lauderdale, hello. caller: hello. good morning. i feel that i would be willing to give up some of my medicare benefits. i currently get free shoes and other benefits from medicare that i would be willing to give up. host: anything that you would be willing to give up on your taxes? items that you have in the past? caller: i would be willing to give up my charitable deductions. host: how come? caller: i feel that i give part of it to my charitable deductions. host: would you still make donations to charity if you could not write it off on your taxes? caller: yes, i would. host: thank you for your call. joe? caller: i would be willing to give up earned income credit and i liked what the last caller said about modifying the amount for charitable
new york times book critic has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. what sunday evening, at 7:30 eastern and pacific, on american history tv. >> the american enterprise institute heard from the incoming and outgoing chairman of the republican study committee today. they talked about what they would like to see in a tax and budget deal, and what is ahead for house republicans in the next congress. this is 50 minutes. >> i am delighted to welcome you to a presentation by the outgoing and incoming chairman of the republican study committee of the u.s. congress. we are privileged to host this event, to welcome the incoming chairman, and to thank the outgoing chairman, for their service. this is a special friendship between aei and the irs see that we have cultivated, which has been very rewarding for us. it is very unusual to have an event like this, with the outgoing and incoming leaders, for any organization. but the nature of these leaders makes it more likely than what we would see with most other organizations. the republican study committee -- this is language from the
brooks of the "new york times" seems to have a differing opinion. he writes today, the republican party has a long way to go before it revives itself as a majority party. over the past month the republican party has changed more than i expected. they are moving in the right direction and moving fast. he cites a number of things including the fiscal tax -- sorry. the fiscal cliff looming ahead of republicans and the sort of begrudging view towards reality that the tax rates are going to rise. he talks about marco rubio and paul ryan and offering a vision for the gop. but at the end of the day, marco rubio has said i don't want to pursue comprehensive immigration reform. and look -- >> let's be honest here. >> go ahead. marco rubio said he's not so sure science is a form of evaluating how old the earth is. gave me a break here. you can put lipstick on a pig, it doesn't change the pig. these guys are trying to dress themselves up and avoid talking about the issues. as long as they nominate people like todd aiken and richard murdo murdoch, they're not going to avoid these issues. and as lon
new york times bodh critic on the white house. watch it on sunday on c-span three on "american history tv per." >> congressman steve scalise and jim jordan. >> thank you for coming. to delighted to welcome you a presentation by the outgoing and incoming chairman of the republican study committee of the u.s. congress. we are privileged to host this event and welcomed the incoming chairman and to think the outgoing chairman for their service. this is a special friendship between aei and the republican committee. we have cultivated something that is very rewarding for us. it is unusual to have an event like this regarding the ingoing and outgoing leaders for any organization. the nature of these leaders makes it more likely than what we would see with -- them with other organizations during the republican study committee is not the majority in congress, but there is a majority of the majority. they are the majority of republicans in control of congress. many of you i guess hopeful be in power for many years. i will read this to you because i think it speaks volumes about what these gentle
to change my views. i grew up in new york, very republican, very conservative upbringing, my father was a stockbroker and later in my life i went to see peter one day and i wanted to ask him how did the atomic bomb really get started, because we all treated like it had to be dropped, ended the war, there's no -- so the question bugged me, and we got into the story of how the bomb was dropped. that leads to so many other questions about world war ii, what really happened, and the cold war right after. this is the time when stalin dies in this clip, it's a significant opportunity, again, to bring together the two countries, and it's muffled. >> we see it as a lost opportunity. march 5, 1953, the soviet leaders had decided there was a chance to reverse course, they reached out very, very openly to the west, and the u.s. leaders, eisenhower and dullis debated what to do. eisenhower makes a tremendous speech, then two days later dullis rejects the premise of what eisenhower said and we go back to the intensified cold war. >> you know, we even know that from more contemporary american his
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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